Discontinued App

OAPN Coronary Stenting

This Oxford American Pocket Notes source of information is developed by MedHand Mobile Libraries. Improve your performance with relevant, valid material ...

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Description

This Oxford American Pocket Notes source of information is developed by MedHand Mobile Libraries. Improve your performance with relevant, valid material which is accessed quickly and with minimal effort in the palm of your hand. In the last twenty-five years, coronary stenting stands as the cornerstone of modern day interventional cardiology. Today many choices exist for interventionalists with the most basic delineation being bare metal stents (BMS) and drug eluting stents (DES). Within each broad category there are multiple stent delivery systems, sizes, structural differences, various metal compositions, and anti-proliferative agents for drug eluting. There are several controversies currently surrounding coronary stents. Despite the fact that DES has been proven to decrease vessel restenosis when compared to bare metal stents, the first generation of DES increased the occurrence of late stent thrombosis, which was uncommon with bare metal stents. Additionally, stents have been used for multiple types of lesions with a significant number of these being considered off label indications. Lastly, the duration of dual anti-platelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel following stent implantation, especially DES, needs to be further examined by the medical community. Despite current topics of debate in stenting, much promise exists in coronary intervention with bio-absorbable stents and anti-proliferative balloons currently in development. An understanding of the various principles of coronary stenting factors, including patient appropriateness, potential complications, and peri-operative management, is necessary for any healthcare provider currently treating cardiac patients. Perhaps most importantly, a firm understanding of the importance of dual anti-platelet therapy can have a significant impact on the prevention of stent complications, especially stent thrombosis, which is often associated with significant mortality. This guide will serve as a reference for those healthcare providers who evaluate potential coronary stenting patients, as well as to help them properly manage those who are already stent recipients. Using the ultra-concise, portable format of the Oxford American Pocket Note series, this volume will prove to be a practical guide for interventionalists seeking a quick reference in coronary stenting. Features: •DT Concise and portable •DT Features numerous illustrations and guidance on commonly used equipment •DT Evidence-based discussion on clinical indications and post-operative management of available stents •DT Uniquely portable, a perfect guide for interventionalists seeking a quick reference on coronary stenting Authors: Anthony Bavry, R. David Anderson, William Brearley ________________________________________ MedHand Mobile Libraries offers a SUBSCRIPTION FREE application without edition upgrade. MedHand is the exclusive partner of Oxford University Press, publishing the latest editions of their Medical Handbooks in digital format. MedHand offers user-friendly, quick and intuitive applications for medical books on iPhone, iPod and iPad, supporting you with mobile knowledge at the point of care. Offering the most trusted and well recognized medical guidelines provided by excellent publishers. MedHand delivers what you need, trusted knowledge at the point of care!

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Technical specifications

Version: 2.1.2

Size: 1.94 MB

System:

Price: 9,99 €

Developed by MedHand – Mobile Libraries

Day of release: 2011-10-23

Recommended age: 4+

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